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Ready for a Closeup

Makeup artists and hair stylists play a key role on any movie set.  They are among the first to arrive as their primary job is to get the actors ready for the first scene of the day.  If the director wants the first shot at 8am, Hair and Makeup and the actors who are in the first scene will be asked to arrive by 6:30 to 7, depending on what is needed.

Sarah Clark (right) was the Key, or lead, make up artist and hair stylist on Table 47.  She was ably assisted by Angelique Dugger (center). After make up and hair, Louise Macdonald is ready to shoot a scene.

Sarah Clark (right) was the Key, or lead, makeup artist and hair stylist on Table 47. She was ably assisted by Angelique Dugger (center). After makeup and hair, Louise Macdonald is ready to shoot a scene.

At the very least, makeup that takes the shine off an actor’s face is needed.  This kind of makeup also smoothes out skin tones.  The director works with the hair stylist to determine the hair style suitable for the actor’s role.

Many times, different makeup is needed.  In several scenes, the character of Amy, played by Danielle Prall, needed bruises on her face.  Some bruises needed to be fresh.  In other scenes, those bruises might have discolored or started to heal.  Creating that continuity over the time passages in the script is all part of the makeup department’s job.

Sometimes a scene is shot in two parts, with days or even weeks separating the filming.  Sarah and Angelique referred to photos they took so they could replicate the look when needed again.

Sarah also concocted “blood” for a scene.

I think of makeup in two ways.  Sometimes you never want to know it is there.  Other times, in the case of those bruises, you want the audience to see them, be shocked and believe they are real and not just makeup.

Sarah and Angelique succeeded on both counts.

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